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U.S. News & Politics

The Biden Administration Is Full of It

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I’m angry. I want to write that American life is increasingly full of something, but I can’t write that word here. You’ll figure out what I mean.

Dr. Jill Biden is full of it because she thinks she can make Hispanic people think she cares about them. At a Latinx IncluXion luncheon in San Antonio, she began by mispronouncing bodega as “bogida” (don’t check the altered White House transcript, because transcripts now are full of it; better to see the video) and then compared members of the Hispanic community to breakfast tacos. 

Speaking of bodegas, in New York City, a Dominican bodega worker was charged with murder and spent six days on Riker’s Island for defending himself against an attack. The video starts with the bodega clerk, Jose Alba, selling patrons loosies—individual cigarettes because the patron cannot afford to buy a whole pack, a sign of a classy joint. In a near-perfect New York Story, the girlfriend at the window then announces she can’t pay for a bag of chips after her EBT card is declined, and the boyfriend comes around the counter and shoves Alba, age 61, to the ground.

The boyfriend knows about fighting; he’s out on parole for assaulting a cop. He has a gang symbol, a white do-rag, hanging out of his back left pocket, something the localAlba would recognize as bad news. A fight ensues and Alba stabs his assailant. The girlfriend also had a knife of her own and joined in, two-on-one.

The full-of-it outcome? Manhattan’s recently installed District Attorney Alvin Bragg usually believes that bail is unfair to people of color, a category that tends to include Hispanic people like Alba. Instead, Alba was charged with murder for defending himself, and pounded with a $250,000 bond. Alba couldn’t pay it, so he went to Riker’s until the district attorney’s office lowered the bail to $50,000 amid growing outrage.

While NYC’s mayor vaguely stood behind his DA, one Republican gubernatorial nominee slammed Bragg’s decision to charge Alba, tweeting: “My first Day 1 action as Governor next January will be to fire Manhattan DA Alvin Bragg.” The charges against Alba were eventually dropped, showing the whole thing was full of it anyway.

D.A. Bragg still is, too. He got his job in the aftermath of the Black Lives Matter movement, pledging to cut back on cops harming young black men like the guy who assaulted Jose Alba. The problem is, violence toward black New Yorkers has not decreased, just changed—Bragg’s boss, Mayor Eric Adams, slammed Black Lives Matter after a recent night of black-on-black bloodshed across the city that left more than a dozen people shot. “Where are all those who stated ‘black lives matter’?” Adams asked. Three people were killed and 13 others wounded. Zero were shot by police officers. “The lives of these black children that are dying every night matter,” Adams said. “We can’t be hypocrites.”

While bodega worker Alba appears to be Hispanic, many of New York’s bodegas are operated by Yemenis, the most recent refugees from the Saudi-Yemen-U.S.-Iran war, who are here because American foreign policy is full of it. Joe Biden, who as a candidate promised to make Saudi Arabia an “international pariah” over the murder of WaPo journalist Jamal Khashoggi, just finished begging the Saudis to produce more oil, and thus lower gas prices before the midterms. Biden claims prices are high because of Vladimir Putin, a statement that is completely full of it.

Biden is by no means the first American president to struggle with the fact that American Saudi policy is full of it. George W. Bush enlisted Saudi Arabia as an ally in the War on Terror even though 15 of the 19 9/11 hijackers came from Saudi Arabia, ground zero for the Wahhabism which created the conditions for the attacks. Barack Obama gleefully supported the Saudi-led war in Yemen, a decision no one pulled back even as the war devolved into a humanitarian catastrophe. Donald Trump embraced the kingdom in ways Biden would recognize. They’re all full of it.

Of course Biden’s policy of making war by proxy in Ukraine is based in large part on sanctions on Russia, which are full of it. Sanctions were supposed to win the battle, forcing Russia to withdraw at the risk of her economy’s collapse, perhaps along with Putin’s own regime. The problem is that not only has that not happened, but sanctions have actually aided Russia.

Though Russia’s energy exports fell by volume in reaction to American sanctions, surging prices driven by supply shortages have more than canceled out the sanctions’ effects. Russia’s export prices have been on average around 60 percent higher than last year, driven by simple supply and demand. The E.U. reduced its direct imports of Russian crude oil by 18 percent, but thanks to Russian re-exporters India and the United Arab Emirates, that has led to no net change in Russia’s overall oil-export volumes.

China, too, has helped make up for the E.U. shortfall as the largest single buyer of Russian energy. Japan holds that title for unsanctioned Russian coal imports. Even the U.S. has helped out, buying unsanctioned, highly refined oil products from the Netherlands and India that were at least in part made from Russian crude. The U.S. is helping further by selling its own strategic oil reserves directly to China.

A lot of Biden’s gas problems would go away if he allowed the U.S. to extract domestically the oil it needs, but Biden is steadfastly committed to going green. Except in Alaska, where he has shown his policy statements on energy to be full of it. Biden signaled in early July his new support for a controversial Alaska oil drill, issuing an environmental review that represents a key step toward starting the Willow project. Opponents say drilling would violate Biden’s pledge to rein in the production of fossil fuels, but that promise was always full of it anyway.

The police are full of it, and no one trusts them. The media are full of it, and no one believes them. And if you’ve been paying attention, you know the Biden administration is full of it too.

The American Conservative

The American Conservative is a bimonthly print and daily digital magazine of measured, principled conservatism. We believe in ideas over ideology and principles over party.

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